Posted on

Apeman A60 Action Camera – What You Need to Know

Action Camera

We are new into the action camera world and picked up the Apeman A60 Action Camera to get our feet wet so to speak. We are naturally into camping and all things outdoors as you know which includes canoeing.

It makes me nervous to pull out my phone to take pics and videos while canoeing so I did a little research and came across this little camera. Quick disclaimer: you will need your own Micro SD card (up to 32Mb) in order for this to work. 

What’s in the box?

Apeman A60 Action Camera

When we got the box, the first thing we noticed was how well it was packaged. This camera is packaged nice enough to be given as a gift. I say that because many lower cost action cameras are not packaged nearly as nice as this. Inside the box is a black zippered case that holds the camera, battery, and all the mounts that it comes with. The case is somewhat hard sided, but I doubt shock proof. It has foam padding and cut outs for the various attachments and mounts. 

There are a number of different mounts inside the box. There is the waterproof case, there are 2 flat mounts for helmets or whatever, tripod mounts, bike handlebar or pole mount, and extension pieces which make hinges for various angles, and a housing to use the camera on a mount outside of the waterproof housing, a clip to mount the camera to almost anything. Some of the miscellaneous items included are double stick pads for a couple of the mounts, 4 zip ties, a couple velcro straps, microfiber cloth, and the charging/data cable.  There is also an instruction booklet and extra door for the waterproof housing. 

Here’s the first video I ever shot with this camera to test it out:

What we liked about the camera:

This little camera takes great video and pictures! The battery seems to last most of the day while using it on & off. It takes really good video and pictures. The 170 degree field of view gives a really cool perspective. This camera is also really small. I think that was probably the biggest surprise; just how small it is. Outside any of the housings, this camera measures 2-1/4″ x 1-9/16″x 15/16″ and weighs just 2oz. The accessories aren’t terribly heavy either so You won’t really notice them if you’re hiking with it. The battery life really didn’t disappoint either. 

Action Camera
An example of the picture quality

This camera has a self timer so it shuts off when not in use after either 3, 5, or 10 minutes (you can select one or turn this feature off).

We didn’t get a chance to play with the motion detection recording, but plan to in the near future. Look for an update. There are other features we haven’t played with either (remember, we’re new to this). We plan to really dive into this camera and test out the various cool features soon. 

The camera was super easy to set up and you can both charge the battery and transfer files through the included micro-USB cable. No need to take the micro-SD card out to transfer files and risk dropping/losing the card. Those things are small!

Action Camera
An example of the easy to follow menu
What we would change:

The only thing we would change would be to have more instructions for the various mounts. We already established that we are new to this world and many of the mounts and accessories are not intuitive. Luckily, there are plenty of online videos that explain the different mounting techniques.  All you have to do is search YouTube for “action camera mounting” and be prepared to spend some time watching videos. We also discovered that storing your action camera in the waterproof case for extended periods tends to compress the pads on the door and the camera isn’t as responsive to turning on/off/changing modes. Removing the camera from the waterproof housing when not being used on/in/near the water seemed to fix this issue.  

Accessories we picked up extra:

Handle (floating) – This camera is small. Without a handle of some sorts, it could easily be dropped. Since we really like the waterproof housing feature, a floating handle makes sense. This particular handle has a textured grip and is a good size in out hands. Get yours here

Action Camera

Flexible tripod – Being able to set the camera down for shooting videos for us is essential. This add-on was a much needed one. We liked this particular tripod because it is lightweight, can wrap around things such as branches, and isn’t terribly expensive. Get yours here

Action Camera

There are a TON of accessories available for action cameras. Helmet mounts, handlebar mounts, chest mounts, car dash mounts, the list goes on & on. After we purchased the above accessories, we bought this assortment  which contains items similar to the above & more. 

Conclusion:

When shopping for a decent action camera that takes good videos & pictures while not breaking the bank; this is the perfect camera. We use this camera for filming various product reviews, out with the Scouts in or out of the water, or just filming things around Camp Gear Center headquarters. If you aren’t sure if an action camera is for you, consider whether or not you take pictures or videos around water or not. This was the #1 reason we picked one up and have not been disappointed by this one. 

If you want to get your own Apeman action camera, click here.

 

Disclosure: Some of the links above are affiliate links, meaning, at no extra cost to you, we will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase.    

 

 

Posted on

How to tie Taut Line Hitch

The taut line hitch is an adjustable loop-type knot for lines under tension. This knot is perfect for tying guy lines to pegs or any place you need to adjust the tension. A fairly easy knot to tie and a very handy one to know.

 

How to tie the taut line

taut line hitch

Make a turn around a post or other object several feet from the free end.

Coil the free end twice around the standing line working back toward the post.

Make one additional coil around the standing line on the outside of the coils just made.

Tighten the knot and slide it on the standing line to adjust tension.

Posted on

Everything I Learned about Camping…

As a kid, I was a Boy Scout (I am now a Scoutmaster). Everyone knows that Boy Scouts like camping. As a Scout, I did a lot of camping, and as a Scoutmaster I seem to do even more. Camping to me is “hitting the reset” button. Whether with my family, or with the troop, being in nature, makes everything better.

Below are some of the things I’ve learned over my camping career (some the hard way).

Camping Lessons:

  • Pitch your tent in your garden or yard beforehand your first outing  to make sure it’s all there and you know how to set it up.
  • On uneven ground, don’t pitch your tent in a valley. That’s the first place water & moisture will pool.
  • Always make a list of the things required, and tick it off as it goes in the pack.
  • If it is windy, be sure to stake down your tent. Even if the tent can’t be picked up by the wind, the corner can flap like crazy.
  • Double check your equipment before heading out. Make sure the gas stove works, you have fuel for it, you have batteries for the flashlight, etc.
  • Pre-prepared meals can save a bunch of time. If you make up your dry pancake ingredients beforehand, you will only have to mix in the wet in the morning.
  • A hotel bar of soap inside an old pantyhose leg hung by the water faucet is a convenient place to keep it. Not only does your soap not get lost, but the pantyhose act as an abrasive to help clean your hands.
  • Take spare tent pegs and invest in good pegs that won’t bend easily.
  • Consider a site with good facilities for first timer camping experiences.
  • 2 words: extra batteries. Nothing worse than being out camping with a dead flashlight.
  • Take extra plastic bags for wet clothes, wet shoes, trash, etc.
  • Remember to bring a can opener. I always keep a military style P38 in my bag and mess kit.
P38 can opener. A must for camping!
P38 can opener

 

  • Being close to the camp toilet, while convenient, isn’t always the best spot. Try to camp up wind.
  • Duct tape. Always take this. I’ve repaired tent fly, splinted broken poles, mended cooking utensils, repaired canoes, the possibilities are endless. In stead of bringing a whole roll, I wrap a fair amount around an old piece of PVC pipe.
  • Enjoy yourself!

What camping tips or lessons do you have? Comment below. Before you do, be sure to sign up for our newsletter.

Posted on

How Much Gear is Too Much?

As an assistant Scoutmaster, I have the opportunity to do a lot of camping. I love being out in the wild with the Scouts; it makes me feel younger and I get quality time with my son. We do a variety of camping, from “dump-outs” to “backpacking” trips. I love both types of camping and always look forward to the next one before the current trip is even over.

Backpack Camping:
Backpacking trips with the scouts are great for the following reasons:

  1. Every scout is responsible for all his gear.
  2. Cooking on a backpack stove is always interesting.
  3. The younger scouts really learn what “roughing it” can mean
  4. There is less impact on the campsite
  5. We can be a little more remote
Coffee is important

Dumpouts:

Dump-outs are great trips with the scouts for a number of reasons.

  1. The food is ALWAYS good.
  2. Plenty of man power to get everything done.
  3. There are almost always enough supplies.
  4. We usually attract more scouts – which is always entertaining!
  5. Did I mention the food?

 

Lots of gear on this trip

When we do our dump-outs, we bring the troop trailer which has everything under the sun in it. We have at least 4 dutch ovens, multiple cooking sets (utensils, pots, bowls, etc), food gets stored there, wash bins, extra TP, rakes, shovels, propane, you name it. Which brings me to the question: How much is too much?

With a dump-out, all the gear (and usually scout gear included) is pulled in a 10′ trailer. We usually have a larger group so loading & unloading isn’t an issue. The scouts usually prepare some really good meals with all the coocking gear as well! Did we use that 20′ canopy in the trailer? You bet! it was a hot weekend and it provided some much needed shade. Some of the leaders were able to bring cots for in their tents, a few EZ-Up canopies were also brought. We were quite comfortable.

BSA regulations won’t allow a scout to carry more than 25% of his body weight in his pack. This can be an issue for some of the smaller guys. It really makes you look at your gear to see what is truly essential.

It comes down to how much gear does it take to be comfortable? Nobody wants to go camping and be miserable (well maybe a few people). My advice is to bring what you think you’ll need. Would you being a cast iron pan on a backpacking trip? Probably not. Are you going to rake your site upon departure? Probably not on a backpacking trip. I also recommend bringing things that can serve multiple needs. Do you need a bowl, pot, & plate on a back pack trip? I suggest eating straight out of the pot if it’s just you. Less to clean too! For a list of camping essentials, click here.

What are your  essentials? What have you taken on  a trip that you wished you hadn’t?